The Supreme Court and Election Law: Judging Equality from Baker v. Carr to Bush v. Gore

By Richard L. Hasen | Go to book overview

4
Deferring to Political Branches
on Contested Equality Claims

Who Decides the Validity of Contested
Political Equality Measures and Why?

Voters in Missouri pass a law limiting individual campaign contributions to state officials to amounts as low as $100.1 Congress decides to suspend state-imposed literacy tests for voting in state and local elections six years after the Supreme Court holds that such tests, if fairly administered, do not violate the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.2 The New York legislature, in order to comply with the U.S. Justice Department's interpretation of the Voting Rights Act and to satisfy demands of its members to protect themselves and gain partisan advantage during the redistricting process, draws majority-minority districts that split a cohesive religious group into two districts.3

At first glance, these three actions have little in common beyond embracing the field of election law. In the first case, voters act through the initiative process to curb the role of money in elections. In the second case, Congress acts to impose a national standard for voter qualifications. In the third case, a state legislature pursues its own self-interested goals in redistricting while complying with federally imposed districting standards.

The common thread running through each action is that political actors have come together—at least arguably—to impose a contested version of political equality. There is (or was, in the case of literacy tests) no consensus or near-consensus that political equality requires very low campaign contribution limits, a ban on literacy tests in voting, or the creation of majority-minority districts.

-101-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Supreme Court and Election Law: Judging Equality from Baker v. Carr to Bush v. Gore
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 227

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.