The Baltic States and Their Region: New Europe or Old?

By David J. Smith | Go to book overview

The gatekeeper “hinge” concept and the promotion of
Estonian, Latvian and Lithuanian new/postmodern
security agendas

Paul Holtom

The Baltic security dilemma has had an impact on the
whole northeast European region, with consequences for
Scandinavia, continental Europe, the European Union,
Russia and NATO. This region is a kind of historical
laboratory, a meeting-point of modernity and post-
modernity where new principles of international
relations are being formed and put to test.1

In the 1990s, the foreign and security policies of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania revolved around the following “security trinity”: remain independent sovereign states; return to Europe; and stress separation from Russia and a desire to remain outside the “Russian sphere.” At the heart of this formulation, was the idea that the “return to Europe” would be the most useful means of guaranteeing the first and third elements of the trinity. This line of thinking promoted the idea that by joining the EU and NATO, the independence of the Baltic States would be best protected against Russian revanchism directed at limiting the sovereignty of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. However, for analysts such as Gražina Miniotaitė the thoroughly modern aims of securing independent sovereign statehood rubbed against the postmodern statehood required of members of the EU and NATO. For Miniotaitė, there was a tension between the Baltic States' discourses of sovereignty and discourses of integration. Or put another way, it appeared somewhat strange that the Baltic States “modern” security concerns were pushing them towards institutions that espoused “postmodern” security agendas.

This is the departure point for this chapter, as it seeks to ask where one would place the Baltic States on a modern-postmodern security spectrum. Using declarations of security priorities and threats as a guide, the chapter attempts to judge the balance constructed by Estonian, Latvian and Lithuanian foreign and security policy-makers between old and new, military and non-military, hard and soft, security threats. In the analysis of Miniotaitė and other security analysts to be discussed in this paper, the Baltic States have often been portrayed as lying “in-transit” between modern and post-modern Europe, with integration interactions impacting upon thoughts about sovereignty in the “Europe” to which they sought to “return.” Their geographical location has lent further credence to the metaphor of “in-between” or “in-transit” used to describe their shift from modern to post-modern European statehood. This chapter also draws upon

-293-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Baltic States and Their Region: New Europe or Old?
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 322

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.