Dada Culture: Critical Texts on the Avant-Garde

By Dafydd Jones | Go to book overview

A Decade of Dada Scholarship:
publications on Dada, 1994–2005

Timothy Shipe

Dada Culture appears at a particularly interesting juncture in the history of Dada bibliography. As we begin the ten-year countdown to the centennial of the Cabaret Voltaire, we may anticipate a heightened interest in the Dada movement, to be accompanied no doubt by a massive increase in published scholarship on Dada and the individual Dadaists. Furthermore, it seems likely that events such as the “blockbuster” exhibition at the Centre Pompidou and the National Gallery of Art in Washington and the reopening of the original Cabaret Voltaire in Zürich as an innovative gallery and performance space will arouse the interest of the general public, leading to a flurry of publications aimed at the educated layperson.

The year 2005 saw not only the opening of the Centre Pompidou exhibition, but also the completion of the largest single publication project in the history of Dada scholarship, the ten-volume series Crisis and the Arts: The History of Dada (1996–2005) edited by Stephen C. Foster. Since that series ended with the promised bibliographic volume by Jörgen Schäfer, and since it began ten years earlier with a volume that included significant bibliographic essays by Rainer Rumold and Michel Sanouillet, it seems fitting to provide here a selective bibliographic survey of the literature of Dada of the decade since the publication of volume 1 of Crisis and the Arts. Rumold and Sanouillet surveyed the literature through roughly 1993; therefore, in the following pages I will address the state of the literature from 1994 through the fall of 2005.

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