Slavery and Politics in the Early American Republic

By Matthew Mason | Go to book overview

Sponsors of and participants in the International Seminar on the History of the Atlantic World at Harvard University, the New England Slavery and the Slave Trade Conference of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, and especially the Newberry Library Early American History Seminar provided valuable insights and critiques of my work. I thank them for their attention to it.

Ira Berlin deserves special thanks. As my final graduate advisor at the University of Maryland, he provided not only invaluable aid, especially in improving my writing, but also a model of the engaged and influential scholar and teacher. In the years since, he has stayed involved in my work, offering commentaries on various chapters here. He has also given treasured professional advice and in general been a valued friend.

Then there is my family. Thanks for things too numerous to list here go to our parents. I started this project at the time our oldest daughter, Emily, was born, and it is gratifying to see it hit a few library bookshelves before she is old enough to offer her own critiques of it. Both she and her sisters, Hannah and Rachel, are our pride and joy and help provide incentive for me to do my best in whatever I do. I dedicate this effort to my wife, Stacie, who has read less of it than she has wished—a trio of high-energy girls running around the house will do that. But as a smart nonspecialist she has long been the kind of reader I aim for when I write. And more importantly, she has made the last fifteen-plus years of our life together a great joy.

-xii-

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Slavery and Politics in the Early American Republic
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Slavery and Politics in the Early American Republic iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations and Maps ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Slavery and Politics to 1808 9
  • 2: Federalists, Republicans, and Slavery During the War of 1812 42
  • 3: Slavery and Partisan Conflict During the Era of Good Feelings 75
  • 4: Slavery in Anglo-American Relations 87
  • 5: The Political Impact of African Americans 106
  • 6: Defending Against Slavery 130
  • 7: Defending Slavery 158
  • 8: Commencement Exercises: the Missouri Crisis 177
  • 9: Antebellum Legacies 213
  • Notes 239
  • Bibliography 305
  • Index 331
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