The On-Demand Brand: 10 Rules for Digital Marketing Success in an Anytime, Everywhere World

By Rick Mathieson | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

You can always blame it on Burger King.

It was, after all, nearly three decades ago that the “Home of the Whopper” first introduced a simple, seemingly innocuous notion into popular culture that would have profound and unexpected repercussions well into the twenty-first century.

As those around in the 1970s can tell you, consumers everywhere were told that, yes, they could “hold the pickles,” or “hold the lettuce.”

With a song and a smile, TV commercials featuring dancing cashiers reassured a previously unrecognized nation of anxious fast foodies that “Special orders don't upset us. All we ask is that you let us serve it your way. Have it your way—at Burger King.”

Have it your way. A simple, refreshing, underheralded introduction to “mass customization,” the technological capability to personalize any order, on demand.

Fast-forward to the present day, and you can see the workings of what has irresistibly and incontrovertibly become an on-demand economy. The medium that introduced us to that old-time fast food campaign couldn't be more different. Where once there were three broadcast television networks, there are now literally hundreds of TV channels, seemingly niche-programmed down to subsets of subsets of consumer tastes.

History buffs, homosexuals, gardeners, and gearheads all have their own TV networks. Programming is no longer a one-time-period-fitsall affair. Indeed, it is no longer a one-device-fits-all affair, either.

-ix-

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