Battle Cries: Black Women and Intimate Partner Abuse

By Hillary Potter | Go to book overview

Bibliography

Abel, Eileen Mazur. “Comparing the Social Service Utilization, Exposure to Violence, and Trauma Symptomology of Domestic Violence Female 'Victims' and Female 'Batterers.'” Journal of Family Violence 16 (2001): 401–420.

Abraham, Margaret. Speaking the Unspeakable: Marital Violence Among South Asian Immigrants in the United States. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2000.

Alkebulan, Adisa A. “The Spiritual Essence of African American Rhetoric” In Understanding African American Rhetoric: Classical Origins to Contemporary Innovations, ed. Ronald L. Jackson II and Elaine B. Richardson, 23–40. New York: Routledge, 2003.

Alkhateeb, Sharifa. “Ending Domestic Violence in Muslim Families.” Journal of Religion and Abuse 1, 4 (1999): 49–59.

All in the Family: Edith Bunker. Retrieved September 9, 2004, from http://www. tvland.com/shows/aitf/character2.jhtml.

Allard, Sharon A. “Rethinking Battered Woman Syndrome: A Black Feminist Perspective.” UCLA Women's Law Journal 1 (1991): 191–207.

Ammons, Linda L. “Mules, Madonnas, Babies, Bath Water, Racial Imagery, and Stereotypes: The African-American Woman and the Battered Woman Syndrome” Wisconsin Law Review 5 (1995): 1003–1080.

Archer, John. “Sex Differences in Aggression Between Heterosexual Partners: A Meta-Analytic Review.” Psychological Bulletin 126 (2000): 651–680.

Asbury, Jo-Ellen. “African-American Women in Violent Relationships: An Exploration of Cultural Differences” In Violence in the Black Family: Correlates and Consequences, ed. Robert L. Hampton, 89–105. Lexington, MA: Lexington, 1987.

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