Getting Played: African American Girls, Urban Inequality, and Gendered Violence

By Jody Miller | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The research I present here was funded by the National Consortium on Violence Research. In addition to consortium members, I thank Norm White, co-principal investigator on the grant, as well as Ruth Peterson, Darnell Hawkins, and Linda Sharpe-Taylor, who served as project consultants. I also appreciate the hard work of our research assistants, Toya Like, Iris Foster, Dennis Mares, and Jenna St. Cyr. I owe Toya a special debt of thanks. She was the heart and soul of this project. She cared deeply about the young people she interviewed and connected with them in ways that benefited the research tremendously. I alone bear responsibility for the analyses that follow, but none of it would have been possible without Toya's commitment to the project.

A number of additional individuals contributed to the production of this research. Olivia Quarles served as youth advocate for the project and was generous with her time and insights. She ran Project Respond (PREPP), the program where my photography course was taught, and provided her kids with an amazing amount of love and support. It's disheartening to report that during the course of our research, PREPP lost its funding and its doors were closed. The youths we spoke to lamented their loss of the safe haven they attributed to keeping them off the streets and daily contact with the mentor they relied on and loved dearly. Likewise, I thank Constance White and Beverly Humphrey at the now defunct King and Madison Tri-Α schools, who coordinated interviews for us at their institutions. I am appreciative of Cathy McNeal, Jessie Bridges, Emily Byrne, Brenda Stutte, and Virginia Schodroski at the University of Missouri-St. Louis for their administrative expertise and support. And thanks to Ilene Kalish at New York University Press, both for her patience and her editorial guidance, and Despina Papazoglou Gimbel for expertly guiding the book through production.

”Writing a book is a painstaking and time-consuming process. It wouldn't be possible without the support of great friends and colleagues.

-xix-

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