Getting Played: African American Girls, Urban Inequality, and Gendered Violence

By Jody Miller | Go to book overview

1
Perspectives on Gender and
Urban Violence

In his bestselling autobiography Makes Me Wanna Holler: A Young Black Man in America, Nathan McCall describes the routine adolescent practice in his neighborhood of running “trains” on girls— what “white boys call… gang-banging”1 and scholars now call gang rape. He explains:

Although everybody knew it could lead to trouble with the law, I think
few guys thought of it as rape. It was viewed as a social thing among
hanging partners, like passing a joint. The dude who set up the train got
pats on the back. He was considered a real player whose rap game was
strong.… Even though it involved sex, it didn't seem to be about sex
at all. Like almost everything we did, it was a macho thing. Using a
member of one of the most vulnerable groups of human beings on the
face of the earth—Black females—it was another way for a guy to
show the other fellas how cold and hard he was.2

In another award-winning book, Always Running: La Vida LocaGang Days in L.A., Luis Rodriguez recounts that rape was “a common circumstance” among his peers.3 Both authors provide searing analyses of racial and class inequalities, urban violence, and their devastating effects on the psyches and behaviors of young men of color. They also describe violence against young women in their communities as routine. Yet, while many scholars of urban crime recognize the connections between racial inequality, neighborhood disadvantage, and violence, the gender-based violence so readily recounted by McCall, Rodriguez, and others is largely absent from the discussion. In the end, violence against young women is a ubiquitous but too often invisible feature of the urban landscape, and it remains largely underexamined and thus undertheorized.4

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Getting Played: African American Girls, Urban Inequality, and Gendered Violence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 292

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.