Framing Equal Opportunity: Law and the Politics of School Finance Reform

By Michael Paris | Go to book overview

NOTES

NOTES TO INTRODUCTION

1. Kozol (1991).

2. To ask these questions is not to answer them, of course. School finance policy questions are complicated, and current arrangements have been defended on a variety of grounds. I provide a review of the normative and empirical policy debates in Chapter Tree.

3. For overviews of school finance reform litigation, see West and Peterson (2007). An appendix in West and Peterson provides a comprehensive review of litigation through 2005. See also Hanushek (2006); Koski and Reich (2006); Koski (2004); McUsic (1999, 2004); Hochschild and Scovronick (2003); Schrag (2003); Heise and Ryan (2002); Reed (2001), Ladd and Hansen (1999); Ladd, Chalk, and Hansen (1999); Ryan (1999a, b); Gittell (1998); and Enrich (1995). The best single source of current state-by-state information is the website of the Advocacy Center for Children's Educational Success with Standards (ACCESS), maintained by New York State's Campaign for Fiscal Equity and Teacher's College: www.schoolfunding.info. ACCESS reports that, between 1989 and 2007, plaintiffs won final court victories in no fewer than twenty states, while defendants won such victories in eleven states.

4. My conception of ideology is liberal and nonpejorative. An ideology is simply a set of culturally conditioned beliefs, “a symbolic framework in terms of which to formulate, think about, and react to political problems …” (Scheingold 2004: 14, quoting Geertz). Here, ideology runs back to individuals, albeit individuals situated in social milieus. It is simply a specific set of values, beliefs, and preferences, held by some specified social actors, about something in particular. Ideology in this sense is an inevitable fact of life for all human beings—it is the natural result of our “emotion-laden and partial response to the world and to others in it,” and it gives “any thinking person a sense of direction” (Shklar 1986: 4). Social actors may be more or less aware, or unaware, of what the observer interprets to be their ideological orientation. My use of the term ideology also signals that I

-243-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Framing Equal Opportunity: Law and the Politics of School Finance Reform
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 322

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.