Germany and the Causes of the First World War

By Mark Hewitson | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

In a certain sense, I have been researching and writing this book for the last twenty years, usually with little success or obvious aptitude. As a result, I have acquired a considerable number of debts, from the completion of my first (and unremittingly appalling) essay on the subject to more recent (and perhaps just as ineffectual) published articles. In particular, I would like to thank Neal Rigby, the teacher who first awakened my interest in the topic, and Hartmut Pogge von Strandmann, the supervisor to whom I owe several (although, I am sure he would want to make clear, not all) of the ideas in this volume. I have also been lucky to have had the opportunity to teach many of the themes of the book to students at the University of Exeter and to discuss them at seminars and lectures at the Institute of Historical Research and at the German Historical Institute, London. On different occasions, my colleagues at University College London have been the hapless victims of various ramblings, as have Eckard Michels, who kindly provided advice and information, and Annika Mombauer, who very generously read the manuscript in its entirety. Most of all, I have to apologize, once again, to my family for another series of postponed weekends and another half-neglected Christmas; and both to apologize to, and to thank, Cécile Laborde for putting up with the same (and much more), and for taking an interest in a piece of work which is in many ways far removed from the focus of her own research. For these (and for countless other) reasons, I have dedicated this book to her.

Mark Hewitson,
London, June 2004.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Germany and the Causes of the First World War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 268

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.