Transcendent in America: Hindu-Inspired Meditation Movements as New Religion

By Lola Williamson | Go to book overview

Notes

NOTES TO CHAPTER 1

1. 2001–03 Bede Griffiths Assn. “Summary of paper presented by Bruno Barnhart at the Monastic Symposium, New Camaldoli, June 2000.” http://www. bedegriffiths.com/wisdom/wisdom_11.htm (accessed July 22, 2008).

2. Although it appears to the outsider that followers of Hare Krishna are attempting to imitate Hindu culture, they themselves do not see it that way. Steven J. Gelberg, a scholar of religion and participant in ISKCON (International Society for Krishna Consciousness), states, “As we saw it, we had not affiliated ourselves with a cumulative tradition formed and shaped by particular historical, ideological, and social contingencies, but rather were partaking in an enlightened, transcendent culture.” “The Call of the Lotus-Eyed Lord,” in Miller, When Prophets Die, 155.

3. Worldviews: Crosscultural Explorations of Human Beliefs (New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 1999).

4. Yogananda, Man’s Eternal Quest, 13. 5. Maharishi, On the Bhagavad-Gita, 449.

6. Gurumayi, unpublished transcript, Mar. 8, 1991, quoted by Douglas Brooks in Meditation Revolution, 592, n27.

7. W. C. Smith explains this process in Meaning and End of Religion, 42–43.

8. The Art of Living Foundation advertised in 2008 that it has taught over a million people the “Sudarshan Kriya” technique in more than 130 countries.

9. D. G. White argues in Kiss of the Yogini (2) that “For a wide swath of central India in the pre-colonial period, Tantra would have been the ‘mainstream,’ and in many ways it continues to impact the mainstream, even if emic misappreciations of Tantra tend to relegate it to a marginal position.”

10. Larson notes differences between methods of propagation in traditional Hinduism and Neo-Hinduism, drawing on the work of J. N. Farquhar and Kenneth W. Jones, India’s Agony over Religion, 134–35.

11. Raheja and Gold, Listen to the Heron’s Words, xxviii.

12. This refers to a type of conversion in which a person makes a pronouncement of faith. Conversion to Hinduism did take place on a cultural level as Hindu traders and settlers entered other countries as, for example, in Bali.

13. Hacker, Philology and Confrontation, 231.

14. Ahlstrom, “From Sinai to the Golden Gate,” in Needleman and Baker, Understanding the New Religions, 3–22.

15. Ibid., 9.

16. Ahlstrom, Religious History, 309.

17. Moseley, Cultural History of Religion in America, 62.

18. Ahlstrom, Religious History, 391.

19. Ibid., 366–67.

20. Tweed and Prothero, Asian Religions in America, 43.

21. Kopf, British Orientalism, 5.

22. Spencer Lavan, “The Brahmo Samaj,” in Baird, Religion in Modern India, 4–5.

23. A Gift to Deists (Calcutta: Sadharan Brahmo Samaj, 1949), n.p. Quoted by

-235-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Transcendent in America: Hindu-Inspired Meditation Movements as New Religion
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • A Note on Transliteration vii
  • Preface ix
  • I - Background 1
  • 1: What Are Hindu-Inspired Meditation Movements? 3
  • 2: Laying the Foundation for American-Style Hinduism 26
  • II - Three Hindu-Inspired Meditation Movements 53
  • 3: Self-Realization Fellowship 55
  • 4: Transcendental Meditation 80
  • 5: Siddha Yoga 106
  • III - In Their Own Words 133
  • 6: The Guru-Disciple Relationship 135
  • 7: Mystical Experiences 161
  • 8: Worldview 186
  • Conclusion 215
  • Notes 235
  • Bibliography 243
  • Index 251
  • About the Author 261
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 261

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.