Student Achievement through Staff Development

By Bruce Joyce; Beverly Showers et al. | Go to book overview

5

Designing Training and
Peer Coaching: Our Needs
for Learning

In the early 1980s, we published a review of research on training design and a set of hypotheses relating to transfer of new learning to classroom practice (Joyce & Showers, 1980). In the 20 years since, two notable changes have occurred in the field of staff development. First, the duration and intensity of many training events have greatly increased, including various forms of follow-up and continuing technical support; and second, one-shot events tend to be carefully prefaced with, “This session is for awareness only.” In other words, we've achieved greater clarity between objectives that entail the acquisition of information and those that include changes in educational practice.

Gradually, we have made substantial changes in our framework for thinking about staff development in the years since this book first appeared. We've been influenced by the work of organizational and change theorists (Fullan, 1990, 2001; Huberman, 1992; Miles, 1992; Seashore-Louis & Miles, 1990). Our own numerous attempts to work with districts, schools, teams of teachers, and individuals to increase student growth in all its manifestations have ripened some of our concepts and altered others. The school/school district complex is clearer to us. The learning environment that students experience is located in schools. The school is the organizational unit where curricular and instructional changes take place, and the challenge is for them to become self-renewing organizations where the faculties continually seek to improve the educational environment. The school district greatly affects what will happen in the school. The district creates the overall structure for staff development (including provisions for time), helps schools locate promising options, and generates initiatives across curriculum areas that schools cannot mount by themselves.

We have also continued to refine a training design that enables teachers to learn and use new knowledge and behaviors that translate

-69-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Student Achievement through Staff Development
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 219

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.