Hungary in the Cold War, 1945-1956: Between the United States and the Soviet Union

By László Borhi | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III
THE COMMUNISTS TAKE OVER

International politics in 1947 revolved around the German question. The Soviets understood that a shift had taken place in U.S. policy on Germany and feared that Germany was being organized against them. Although it was clear that a settlement based on each power having a free hand in their own zone was an impossibility, the splitting of Germany was not implemented immediately. The new Secretary of State George C. Marshall, was reluctant to break with the Soviets being afraid that the Germans would play the U.S. off against the Soviets. When the Soviets offered to unify Germany on the western model in return for reparations from current West German production, Marshall was ready to accept limited deliveries. Eventually Stalin's offer was rejected because for the United States, a unified Germany was no longer an attractive alternative. Western Europe would be unified behind a common policy of defending Western civilization, and West Germany would be a central partner in this arrangement. In late 1947 settlement on a unified basis was no longer an alternative, as this would involve bringing the Russians into the Ruhr region and giving them control of the western zones. By 1948, historian Marc Trachtenberg argues, the need for an integrated Western Europe, of which West Germany was a part, had become a dogma of U.S. policy.1 The Russians themselves kept two stakes in the fire: on the diplomatic front they tried to keep the options open for a unified Germany, while at the same time worked toward the Sovietization of their own zone of occupation.2 The rift between the great powers over the fate of Germany was not the only development that pointed toward continental division. Secretary of State Marshall's July 1947 speech offered American assistance to freedom loving nations, but there was an implicit indication that the parts of Europe already occupied by the Soviet Union would not benefit from it. Although some architects of the Marshall Plan originally conceived it to promote European economic and in consequence political unity, in reality it contributed to the opposite. Initially Stalin seems to have considered Soviet and limited East European participation. But when it turned out that the terms were at odds with the Soviet Union's exclusive domination of the region and involved foreign meddling in its domestic economy, the Soviets walked out and ordered their satellites to

-111-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Hungary in the Cold War, 1945-1956: Between the United States and the Soviet Union
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter I - We Do Not Wish to Move a Finger 17
  • Chapter II - The Myth of Democracy 47
  • Chapter III - The Communists Take Over 111
  • Chapter IV - The Merchants Ofthe Kremlin 139
  • Chapter V - Empire by Coercion 197
  • Chapter VI - Ontainment, Rollback, Liberation or Inaction? 269
  • Conclusion 325
  • Bibliography 335
  • Index 347
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 360

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.