Monty Python and Philosophy: Nudge Nudge, Think Think!

By Gary L. Hardcastle; George A. Reisch | Go to book overview

7

Monty Python and the Holy
Grail: Philosophy, Gender,
and Society

REBECCA HOUSEL

We're Knights of the Round Table

We dance whene'er we're able.

We do routines and chorus scenes

With footwork impeccable.

We dine well here in Camelot

We eat ham and jam and Spam a lot.

—Knights, Monty Python and the Holy Grail


Mynd You, Moose Bites Kan Be
Pretty Nasti …

This chapter examines the historical and philosophical context and significance of Arthurian legend and Grail romances to uncover the serious roots of this very funny film, Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Aristotle (384–322 B.C.) said, “The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet.” Humor is always rooted in truth, which is exactly why it's so amusing. Looking at the intriguing, yet serious, undertones of Monty Python and the Holy Grail will enrich any audience experience. Now let's move on before this book's editors decide to sack the author or— worse—forty specially-trained, Ecuadorian mountain llamas decide to take over.

-83-

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