The Debate over Corporate Social Responsibility

By Steve May; George Cheney et al. | Go to book overview

3

Progressing from Corporate Social
Responsibility to Brand Integrity

MALCOLM MCINTOSH

The decade from 1995 to 2005 was significant for corporate social responsibility (CSR). The year 2005 was 10 years since Shell's annus horribilis and their debacle over the disposal of the Brent Spar oil rig in the North Sea and 10 years since they were implicated in the death of Ken Saro-Wiwa, a Nigerian human rights activist who was murdered by his government for protesting about the distribution of revenues from what was perceived to be Shell's damaging extrication of oil from the Ogoni region of Nigeria. This decade also saw the flowering of the Global Reporting Initiative (www.globalreporting.org), out of the CERES Principles (www.ceres.org), the development of workplace management systems certification (SA8000), the birth of AccountAbility (www.accountability21 .net) and sustainability management systems assurance (AA1000S) out of the Institute for Social and Ethical Accountability, and the first five years of the United Nations Global Compact (www .unglobalcompact.org). In this chapter, I chart the development of some key ideas and initiatives in the CSR movement in the last decade or so and then suggest a new way forward for a movement that is looking for new directions.

Most pertinent to this chapter is the ongoing debate concerning the links between business profitability and global social progress. While the business benefits of CSR are a topic much debated and written about, it needs to be reiterated over and over again that business operates for the benefits of society, not vice versa. There can never solely be a business benefit from CSR—that is the ususal sense—but rather asocietal and ecological benefit in the widest sense. If a minority gain net material wealth in the short term at the gross expense of society and the planet in the short, medium, or long term, what real benefit is that? The only reason to argue the case for the business benefits from CSR is to make the case for business being more socially and ecologically responsible if we are to create a more just and equitable world that uses and shares resources for the benefit of this and future generations.

What, then, is the CSR agenda, and what has it achieved over the last decade or so? This question is linked to a number of significant reports from reputable research organizations that argue the case for CSR and profitability. Next, I discuss some thoughts on the link between capitalism and social progress. This is followed by an exploration of new territory, which argues that the emphasis should move from corporate social responsibility to brand integrity—but in an expanded sense of the term. Indeed, a link is made between the integrity of decision makers and consumers and the integrity of corporations via the integrity of their brands.

While good progress has been made on a number of corporate responsibility initiatives over the last decade, they have not been as successful as they might have been because we have failed to

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Debate over Corporate Social Responsibility
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 490

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.