China between Empires: The Northern and Southern Dynasties

By Mark Edward Lewis | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I would like to express my appreciation to all the scholars whose research I have drawn upon in writing this history of the Northern and Southern Dynasties. Their names can be found in the notes and bibliography. I also wish to acknowledge my debt to Timothy Brook, general editor of the History of Imperial China, for support and many helpful conversations; to Kathleen McDermott of Harvard University Press for conceiving and sponsoring the series; and to Susan Wallace Boehmer, also at the Press, for numerous suggestions on how to improve this book. I further owe a great deal to Albert Dien, who read the entire manuscript and offered many criticisms and comments, and whose Six Dynasties Civilization provided invaluable assistance in learning about the material culture of the period and the range of images available. Finally, I would like to thank my wife, Kristin Ingrid Fryklund, for all her work in preparing and proofreading the manuscript. Any remaining errors and, unless otherwise noted, all translations are my own.

-325-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
China between Empires: The Northern and Southern Dynasties
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: The Geography of North and South China 6
  • 2: The Rise of the Great Families 28
  • 3: Military Dynasticism 54
  • 4: Urban Transformation 86
  • 5: Rural Life 118
  • 6: China and the Outer World 144
  • 7: Redefining Kinship 170
  • 8: Daoism and Buddhism 196
  • 9: Writing 221
  • Conclusion 248
  • Dates and Dynasties 261
  • Pronunciation Guide 265
  • Notes 267
  • Bibliography 299
  • Acknowledgments 325
  • Index 327
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 340

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.