A People's History of the European Court of Human Rights

By Michael D. Goldhaber | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 12
The Tortures of Aksoy

Turkey's Kurds receive less attention than Iraq's Kurds, although they are perhaps three times as numerous. They receive less attention than the Northern Irish, although their conflict was ten times bloodier. And they receive less attention than the Bosnians or Kosovars, although their suffering posed a similar test for Europe's democratic self-image. An armed conflict raged between Kurdish separatists and Turkish state forces in southeastern Turkey from 1984 to 1998. At its height in the early 1990s, the conflict rose to the level of a full-scale war. Thirty thousand people were killed, and more than a million dislocated, with welldocumented atrocities on both sides. In dozens of cases, stretching from the mid-1990s to the present, the European Court of Human rights has held Turkey liable for torture, disappearances, extrajudicial executions, and village destruction, as well as for mishandling the trial of the Kurdish insurgent leader Abdullah Ocalan. Strasbourg's sustained engagement with Turkey has shown the real if limited ability of a regional court to transform a national society and blazed new law on gross human rights abuses, beginning with torture.

The Kurdish chapter in Strasbourg began in 1990, when Turkey accepted the individual's right to petition under Europe's human rights convention. Soon Prime Minister Hikmet Cetlin was boasting that there were obviously no human rights violations in Turkey, because no one was petitioning. This enraged human rights advocates in both Turkey and the United Kingdom. The boldest among them took the prime minister's boast as a dare. In 1992 a lawyer from the Diyarbakir Human Rights Association, Fevzi Veznendaroglu, ran into Kevin Boyle, a professor at Essex University who was active in the European court's early Northern Irish cases. They began to discuss a Strasbourg strategy for the Kurds. That strategy was embraced by a young activist in London named Kerim Yildiz, who at the

-123-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A People's History of the European Court of Human Rights
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 226

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.