Citizen: Jane Addams and the Struggle for Democracy

By Louise W. Knight | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

My writing of this biography has been, in ways Addams would have appreciated, a cooperative venture. Although I have written it alone at my computer, the insights of many minds have profoundly shaped what I have been able to understand and capture on the page. Previous scholarship about Addams and the movements she was involved with has been essential. Readers interested in a history of that scholarship will find it summarized in this book's afterword. Colleagues and friends have helped in many different ways. I thank in particular Mary Lynn McCree Bryan, whose superb editing of the Jane Addams Papers and whose early encouragement made this project possible; Neil Coughlan for introducing me as a college student to Jane Addams; Sheila Tobias, whose example of an accomplished author was an early inspiration; Lucy Townsend, Charlene Haddock Seigfried, and Lois Rudnick, who taught me the meaning of scholarly collegiality and whose own scholarship laid foundations on which I could build; Robert Johnston, whose insightful comments improved every chapter; Kathleen Carpenter, Deborah Epstein, Leslie Johnson Harris, Jeanette LaCosse Mustacich, and Zephorene L. Stickney, whose excellent editorial eyes alerted me to snarled sentences, typos, and perplexing references; Susan Herbst, for every possible form of hearty encouragement; Leslie Johnson Harris (again), for her invaluable research assistance; and Michael Leff, for introducing me to the discipline of rhetoric and for believing in me and the book. My colleagues in Jane Addams scholarship, in addition to Bryan, Townsend, and Siegfried, have included Marilyn Fischer, Shannon Jackson, Bridget O'Rourke, and Rosemarie Redlich Scherman. Carolyn Gifford has been my colleague in studying the lives of great nineteenth-century women.

Many other people helped at crucial points along the way with advice, expert knowledge, resource support, or friendship. These include Peter Ascoli, Henry Binford, Ann Caldwell, Mina Carson, Paul Cimbala, Jill Ker Conway, Chris Cory, Joanne V. Creighton, Mary Dietz, Joseph Ellis, Ann Feldman, Joan Flanagan, Ann Fischbeck, Elzbieta Foeller-Pituch, Paul Fry, Penny Gill, Joan Gittens, Peggy Glowacki, Ann Gordon, Randy Holgate, Jennifer Hochschild, Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz, Shannon Jackson, Julia

-xiii-

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Citizen: Jane Addams and the Struggle for Democracy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations x
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - The Given Life 1860–88 7
  • Chapter 1 - Self-Reliance 1822–60 9
  • Chapter 2 - Three Mothers 1860–73 34
  • Chapter 3 - Dreams 1873–77 56
  • Chapter 4 - Ambition 1877–81 80
  • Chapter 5 - Failure 1881–83 109
  • Chapter 6 - Culture 1883–86 130
  • Chapter 7 - Crisis 1886–88 158
  • Part Two - The Chosen Life 1889–99 177
  • Chapter 8 - Chicago 1889 179
  • Chapter 9 - Halsted Street 1889–91 199
  • Chapter 10 - Fellowship 1892 229
  • Chapter 11 - Baptism 1893 260
  • Chapter 12 - Cooperation 1893–94 282
  • Chapter 13 - Claims 1894 306
  • Chapter 14 - Justice 1895 334
  • Chapter 15 - Democracy 1896–98 363
  • Chapter 16 - Ethics 1898–99 384
  • Afterword : Scholarship and Jane Addams 405
  • Abbreviations 413
  • Notes 417
  • Bibliography 523
  • Index 565
  • Captions 583
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