Citizen: Jane Addams and the Struggle for Democracy

By Louise W. Knight | Go to book overview

W. Kramer, Jane Addams Morse Linn, John J. McCusker, Randall Miller, Julie Nebel, Ellie and Alan Pasch, Angela Ray, Leila J. Rupp, Anne Firor Scott, Richard Schneirov, Barbara Sicherman, Kathryn Kish Sklar, Carl Smith, Gloria Steinem, Glennis Stephenson, Carl Tomizuka, Jake Wachman, Carolyn Winterer, and Elisabeth Young-Bruehl.

In addition to my alma maters, Wheaton College (Massachusetts) and Wesleyan University, which nurtured my love of historical scholarship and writing, I am especially in debt to five educational institutions whose wonderful research resources were invaluable to me at different stages of this project: Duke University, Wheaton College (Massachusetts), Brown University, Mount Holyoke College, and Northwestern University. At these institutions, librarians of all sorts, from those in reference to those in acquisitions to the magicians in interlibrary loan, have been crucial partners. I am also grateful to Spertus Institute for interlibrary loan and research administration support while I was teaching there. At the archives where I did research, I thank Special Collections Librarian Mary Ann Bamberger and Professional Library Associate, Patricia Bakunas, Special Collections, The University Library, University of Illinois at Chicago; Head Sherrill Redmon, Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College; Curator Wendy Chmielewski, Swarthmore College Peace Collection; and Archivist Mary Pryor, Rockford College Archives. I am grateful to the Communication Studies Department at Northwestern University for its support. In Stephenson County, I especially thank volunteer Ruth Springer of the Local History Room, Freeport Public Library, Jean Joyce of Lena, Mary Mau of McConnell, and Ron Beam, Clyde Kaiser, and Moira and Thomas Fenwick of the Cedarville Historical Society for their hospitality and help with local history. In Berks County, Pennsylvania, I thank Paul Miller of the Sinking Spring Area Historical Society and Barbara Gill of the Historical Society of Berks County; in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, I think Jane S. Moyer of the Northampton Historical and Genealogical Society.

I am also grateful to the president of Rockford College, Paul Pribbenow, for granting permission for me to publish the oil painting of Addams that appears on the book's cover. The early part of the painting's provenance is undocumented, but it appears from the available evidence that Mary Rozet Smith commissioned the British portrait painter Harrington Mann to paint it in 1899. She apparently wanted to have a portrait of her friend to hang in her bedroom, just as Jane had one of Mary (by Alice Kellogg Tyler) hanging in hers. Mann, though based in London, also did portraits of wealthy

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Citizen: Jane Addams and the Struggle for Democracy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations x
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - The Given Life 1860–88 7
  • Chapter 1 - Self-Reliance 1822–60 9
  • Chapter 2 - Three Mothers 1860–73 34
  • Chapter 3 - Dreams 1873–77 56
  • Chapter 4 - Ambition 1877–81 80
  • Chapter 5 - Failure 1881–83 109
  • Chapter 6 - Culture 1883–86 130
  • Chapter 7 - Crisis 1886–88 158
  • Part Two - The Chosen Life 1889–99 177
  • Chapter 8 - Chicago 1889 179
  • Chapter 9 - Halsted Street 1889–91 199
  • Chapter 10 - Fellowship 1892 229
  • Chapter 11 - Baptism 1893 260
  • Chapter 12 - Cooperation 1893–94 282
  • Chapter 13 - Claims 1894 306
  • Chapter 14 - Justice 1895 334
  • Chapter 15 - Democracy 1896–98 363
  • Chapter 16 - Ethics 1898–99 384
  • Afterword : Scholarship and Jane Addams 405
  • Abbreviations 413
  • Notes 417
  • Bibliography 523
  • Index 565
  • Captions 583
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