Citizen: Jane Addams and the Struggle for Democracy

By Louise W. Knight | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 14
JUSTICE 1895

Returning on December 22 to Chicago from her trip south, Jane Addams found the settlement in good spirits. She wrote Mary Rozet Smith, who remained in South Carolina, “The House seems full of Christmas cheer. … "A"ll is merry as can be.” A hundred and thirty turkeys had been given away, as well as many bushels of cranberries and apples. The four Linn children were all home, and their father had come for a visit. Addams's only disappointment was that Alice, Harry, and Marcet were not also there. She had tried but failed to persuade them to join them. Everyone was complimenting her on her “improved appearance,” she informed Mary, and she felt “quite rested and fat.” Affirming their bonds of devotion, Addams ended, “I bless you, dear, every time I think of you, which is all the time at present.”1

During her travels Addams had not only enjoyed the balm of Mary's affection; she had also found time to ponder the ongoing problem of Hull House's finances, and in particular, her continuing and dangerous financial liability for the settlement's debts and contracts. Reluctantly she had decided the settlement needed to incorporate. Perhaps, too, she was seeing the wisdom of having a board to turn to for donations of a particularly large or urgent sort. She presented a list of possible directors at the Residents' Meeting in late January. In addition to herself, she proposed Helen Culver, William Colvin, Allen Pond, Mary Wilmarth, all friends and advisors and all already major donors to Hull House. Soon after the meeting, she added two more names: Mary Rozet Smith and Edward B. Butler. These seven became the first board of the new Hull House Association, whose incorporation papers were filed with the State of Illinois in March 1895. At the first meeting, Addams would be elected president of the board; she would be reelected every year until her death.2

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Citizen: Jane Addams and the Struggle for Democracy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations x
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - The Given Life 1860–88 7
  • Chapter 1 - Self-Reliance 1822–60 9
  • Chapter 2 - Three Mothers 1860–73 34
  • Chapter 3 - Dreams 1873–77 56
  • Chapter 4 - Ambition 1877–81 80
  • Chapter 5 - Failure 1881–83 109
  • Chapter 6 - Culture 1883–86 130
  • Chapter 7 - Crisis 1886–88 158
  • Part Two - The Chosen Life 1889–99 177
  • Chapter 8 - Chicago 1889 179
  • Chapter 9 - Halsted Street 1889–91 199
  • Chapter 10 - Fellowship 1892 229
  • Chapter 11 - Baptism 1893 260
  • Chapter 12 - Cooperation 1893–94 282
  • Chapter 13 - Claims 1894 306
  • Chapter 14 - Justice 1895 334
  • Chapter 15 - Democracy 1896–98 363
  • Chapter 16 - Ethics 1898–99 384
  • Afterword : Scholarship and Jane Addams 405
  • Abbreviations 413
  • Notes 417
  • Bibliography 523
  • Index 565
  • Captions 583
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