Citizen: Jane Addams and the Struggle for Democracy

By Louise W. Knight | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 16
ETHICS
1898–99

When the year 1898 opened, most of Jane Addams's efforts for women's suffrage still lay ahead of her. Indeed, she had yet to undertake nearly all of the reform work on which her later reputation as a leading reformer would be based. As of early 1898, she had never lobbied Congress or advised a president. Nor did she belong to any national organizations. Although she had acquired a widespread fame from her speeches and related news coverage, the nation's readers had access to only a few published writings by her. These were her two Forum articles (which had also been published in a book of essays), “The Settlement as a Factor” (her essay in Maps), one essay on domestic service in an academic journal, and a few odd printings of excerpts from speeches, mostly in religious publications.

But Addams was about to enter a new stage in her work and achieve a new level of national prominence. In part, this was a result of the changing mood of the times. Left-leaning urban reformers, encountering resistance from conservative state supreme courts and state legislatures and desiring to standardize reforms across state lines, saw the federal government as a possible solution. They were ready to seize the national stage.1 Addams would join in the coming profusion of efforts to better coordinate state campaigns and to pass federal legislation.

Addams's increasing influence and prominence also grew out of her gift for addressing compelling social and moral questions and her developing talent for putting her ideas into national circulation. In 1898 and 1899 five major national journals and magazines would publish her articles about municipal corruption, labor unions, charity, and settlements, and she would begin to amalgamate her thinking into a series of integrated lectures that would become a book. In these years her devotion to a life of combined political action and writing and her profound commitment to

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Citizen: Jane Addams and the Struggle for Democracy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations x
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - The Given Life 1860–88 7
  • Chapter 1 - Self-Reliance 1822–60 9
  • Chapter 2 - Three Mothers 1860–73 34
  • Chapter 3 - Dreams 1873–77 56
  • Chapter 4 - Ambition 1877–81 80
  • Chapter 5 - Failure 1881–83 109
  • Chapter 6 - Culture 1883–86 130
  • Chapter 7 - Crisis 1886–88 158
  • Part Two - The Chosen Life 1889–99 177
  • Chapter 8 - Chicago 1889 179
  • Chapter 9 - Halsted Street 1889–91 199
  • Chapter 10 - Fellowship 1892 229
  • Chapter 11 - Baptism 1893 260
  • Chapter 12 - Cooperation 1893–94 282
  • Chapter 13 - Claims 1894 306
  • Chapter 14 - Justice 1895 334
  • Chapter 15 - Democracy 1896–98 363
  • Chapter 16 - Ethics 1898–99 384
  • Afterword : Scholarship and Jane Addams 405
  • Abbreviations 413
  • Notes 417
  • Bibliography 523
  • Index 565
  • Captions 583
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