Moved to Action: Motivation, Participation, and Inequality in American Politics

By Hahrie Han | Go to book overview

APPENDIX B

Comparison of Variables from the
1990 American Citizen Participation Study and
the 1996 American National Election Study
The list below describes the way each variable was measured in the 1990 American Citizen Participation Study (CPS) and the 1996 American National Election Study (ANES). These variables were used primarily in the analyses in Chapter 4.
DEPENDENT VARIABLE: OVERALL ACTIVITY INDEX
CPS: Constructed as an additive scale of dichotomous variables indicating participation in the following activities: voting, campaign work, contributing campaign money, membership in a political organization, writing a letter to an official, trying to persuade someone how to vote, and attending a political meeting or rally. Scale ranges from zero to 8.
ANES: Constructed as an additive scale from dichotomous variables for participation in the following activities: voting in the 1996 election; spending time volunteering in the past year; being involved with a group in which the respondent discusses politics; talking to others to persuade them to vote for/against a party or candidate; working with others or joining an organization to work on a community problem; attending meetings, speeches, or rallies for the candidate; contributing money to a political candidate or cause; and working for any one of the parties or candidates. Scale ranges from zero to 8.

RESOURCES
Education
CPS: Education coded into six categories based on the highest level of education completed by the respondent: grammar school and less, some high school, high school graduate/GED, some college, college graduate, postgraduate work. Scale ranges from 1 to 6.
ANES: Coded as a 7-point scale: 1 = 8 grades or less and no diploma or equivalent; 2 = 9–11 grades, no further schooling; 3 = High school diploma or GED; 4 = More than 12 years of schooling but no degree; 5 = Junior or community college-level degree; 6 = BA-level degrees; 17+ years, no postgraduate work; 7 = Advanced degree, including LLB. Scale ranges from 1 to 7.
Vocabulary
CPS: Sum of the number of correct answers the respondent provided to ten vocabulary questions. Scale ranges from zero to 10.
ANES: Not included in analysis.

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