Online Student Ratings of Instruction

By D. Lynn Sorenson; Trav D. Johnson | Go to book overview

2
Online Course Evaluation and
Reporting in Higher Education

Many U.S. institutions of higher education are initiating
and expanding the use of the Internet for collecting and
reporting student ratings of instruction.

Kevin M. Hoffman

The Internet has revolutionized the world of higher education. Longstanding and laborious institutional processes have been streamlined or replaced. From student information systems to online registration, the Internet has transformed (and is continuing to transform) the ways in which information is collected, processed, and distributed within institutions.

Online student evaluations of instruction have received increasing attention over the past few years. In 2000, Hmieleski surveyed the nation's two hundred most wired institutions regarding the use of the Internet in evaluating teaching. At that time, he found that 98 percent of responding institutions still used paper-based methods as their predominant approach to student evaluation. The use of the Internet for evaluating teaching was extremely limited outside of distance-education programs. However, since Hmieleski's study, the number of studies and articles about online student evaluations has been growing (Cantera, 2002; Mayer and George, 2003; McGourty, Scoles, and Thorpe, 2002). Given the prevalence of the Internet in higher education (Green, 2002) and the growing literature about online student evaluation, the following question naturally arises: How prevalent is today's use of the Internet for student evaluation of course and instruction in higher education?

The primary objective of the present study is to better understand the effects of the Internet on student ratings of instruction in higher education. More specifically, data were collected to determine the extent to which institutions have adopted the Internet for data collection and reporting of student evaluations of instruction.

-25-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Online Student Ratings of Instruction
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 118

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.