Online Student Ratings of Instruction

By D. Lynn Sorenson; Trav D. Johnson | Go to book overview

8
Course Evaluation on the Web:
Facilitating Student and Teacher
Reflection to Improve Learning

Course Evaluation on the Web is a dynamic, Web-based
system for student reflection on learning, instructor
reflection on teaching, and program management.

Beatrice Tucker, Sue Jones, Leon Straker, Joan Cole

Excellence in teaching and learning is not easily achieved, and it requires more than just a passing participation in an improvement activity (Weimer, 1990). To focus on achieving excellence, educational institutions must place high value on both the process and the outcomes of teaching and evaluation. Good-quality feedback on courses that informs instructors about student perceptions of their teaching is often difficult to obtain. Lack of student feedback may leave instructors relying on their own perceptions of teaching successes and difficulties, which may be different from student perceptions. A cycle of evaluation and improvement based on student feedback is seen as essential to the process of quality improvement (Brown, Race, and Smith, 1997). The improvement of teaching and learning is likely when teachers are supported through a process of reflective dialogue based on student feedback (Brockbank and McGill, 1998).


Traditional Feedback Systems

There are many methods of collecting course feedback. The traditional paper-based method provides good quantitative and qualitative feedback, but it is often time-consuming (for both students and teachers) and laborious to collate and interpret. Teachers who manage several courses often find

Note: Course Evaluation on the Web was funded by a Learning Effectiveness Alliance
Project awarded to the School of Physiotherapy from Curtin University of Technology.

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