Project Coast: Apartheid's Chemical and Biological Warfare Programme

By Chandré Gould; Peter Folb et al. | Go to book overview

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS
On the basis of the available evidence, the following conclusions can be reached about the South African chemical and biological warfare programme:
Whilst South Africa was responsible for the production of lethal chemical warfare agents on a large scale for the Allied Forces during World War II, there is no evidence to suggest that this production was continued after the end of the war.
The perception of threat by the apartheid government during the 1970s, combined with the country's strong material base capable of developing and producing armaments, provided the context within which a chemical and biological warfare programme was deemed necessary to the security of the country.
No reliable evidence has been found to support the idea that South African Defence Forces troops, or UNITA troops, faced chemical attack during their involvement in the war in Angola.
Documentary and testimonial evidence shows that chemical agents were used by the Rhodesian security forces during the Zimbabwean war of independence. There is limited evidence that biological agents were used during that war. A link between the use of chemical and biological warfare agents in Rhodesia and Project Coast cannot be established on the basis of the evidence.
The functions of Project Coast were carried out by three official front companies designed to conceal the SADF's involvement in CBW research, development and production. Other private companies provided services to the Project. Most of these private companies relied upon SADF contracts for their existence.

-7-

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Project Coast: Apartheid's Chemical and Biological Warfare Programme
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Foreword v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Acronyms xiii
  • Introduction* 1
  • Summary of Findings 7
  • The Botha Regime and Total Strategy 11
  • The Regional Context 21
  • Chemical Weapons in South Africa Prior to Project Coast 31
  • Project Coast's Links with the Police and Operational Units of the Military 47
  • Getting Down to Business 57
  • Roodeplaat Research Laboratories 69
  • The Private Companies 103
  • The de Klerk Years (1989-1993) and the Use of Cbw Agents 115
  • The Phases of Project Coast's Development 143
  • Allegations of Fraud: The Sale of Delta G Scientific and Rrl 145
  • The Intention of the Programme 153
  • Incidents of Poisoning 159
  • Structure and Management of Project Coast 169
  • International Links 191
  • Closing Down 209
  • Basson's Arrest and the Trc Hearing 223
  • The Criminal Trial of Dr Wouter Basson 231
  • Notes 241
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