Project Coast: Apartheid's Chemical and Biological Warfare Programme

By Chandré Gould; Peter Folb et al. | Go to book overview

BASSON'S ARREST AND THE TRC HEARING

Between 1992 and 1993, Basson started a procurement company called Global Management to “seek foreign markets for South African-made products”.864 Five people were recruited to work for the company, Jerry Brandt (Managing Director of Organochem865), Marléne Brand, Solly Pienaar, Steve Martin and Grant Wentzel.866

Wentzel described himself as a commodities broker who had dealt in canned fruit, ostrich meat and leather, hi-tech machinery, pumps and unwrought gold (to Japan). He told the court that he had maintained regular contact with Basson over a number of years during which time Basson had advised him how to structure business deals. Basson helped him to obtain AK-47s for a particular deal.867

The events leading to Basson's arrest in January 1997, began when Wentzel was experiencing financial difficulties. Steve Martin, his colleague at Global Management, told Wentzel a way out of his difficulties could be in a market for Ecstasy. Sometime before this, Brandt had told Wentzel he was sure Delta G had manufactured Ecstasy. Wentzel then allegedly approached a Delta G scientist, Gert Lourens, who warned him that the business was “too risky”. Wentzel claimed in his testimony during the Basson trial that shortly thereafter he was called by Basson who allegedly gave him 100 capsules of the drug.868 Wentzel claims he passed these on to Steve Martin in exchange for R4,000. A series of deals then took place. Wentzel was arrested. He agreed to work with the police in creating a trap for his supplier who, he claimed, was Wouter Basson. The deal was taperecorded by the police. Wentzel, who was wearing a recording device, was heard saying that the items were destined for Cape Town. The arrest of Basson was made by the South African Police's Narcotics Bureau.869 Basson said that, contrary to Wentzeľs claims, he was not involved in selling Ecstasy to Wentzel. He alleged that the interaction between the two men related to a deal involving the sale of AK-47s to Pakistan.870 The Judge found that Basson was not the person who supplied Wentzel with the Ecstasy.871

-223-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Project Coast: Apartheid's Chemical and Biological Warfare Programme
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Foreword v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Acronyms xiii
  • Introduction* 1
  • Summary of Findings 7
  • The Botha Regime and Total Strategy 11
  • The Regional Context 21
  • Chemical Weapons in South Africa Prior to Project Coast 31
  • Project Coast's Links with the Police and Operational Units of the Military 47
  • Getting Down to Business 57
  • Roodeplaat Research Laboratories 69
  • The Private Companies 103
  • The de Klerk Years (1989-1993) and the Use of Cbw Agents 115
  • The Phases of Project Coast's Development 143
  • Allegations of Fraud: The Sale of Delta G Scientific and Rrl 145
  • The Intention of the Programme 153
  • Incidents of Poisoning 159
  • Structure and Management of Project Coast 169
  • International Links 191
  • Closing Down 209
  • Basson's Arrest and the Trc Hearing 223
  • The Criminal Trial of Dr Wouter Basson 231
  • Notes 241
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 298

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.