The Spanish Civil War in Literature

By Janet Pérez; Wendell Aycock | Go to book overview

Countering L'Espoir: Two French
Fascist Novels of the Spanish
Civil War

Richard J. Golsan

Because of its well-deserved reputation as one of the great novels of the Spanish Civil War, Andre Malraux's L'Espoir has largely overshadowed other fictional treatments of the conflict written in French. These works include critical successes such as Claude Simon's Le Palace (1962) and Henry de Montherlant's Le Chaos et la Nuit (1963), both written long after the fighting was over, as well as more contemporary works appearing within a few years of the publication of Malraux's masterpiece.1 In the latter category are two novels published in 1939, Robert Brasillach's Les Sept Couleurs and Pierre Drieu La Rochelle's Gilles. Brasillach and Drieu were among the most fervent and outspoken fascist intellectuals in France during the interwar years and the Occupation, and therefore it is not surprising that their novels favor Franco's cause and espouse values very different from those championed in L'Espoir. Les Sept Couleurs and Gilles nevertheless reflect the impact of Malraux's masterpiece both in their thinly disguised efforts to imitate certain aspects of the style of L'Espoir and in their attempts to counter some of its major theses. This is not to say, however, that these fascist novels are purely derivative works. Les Sept Couleurs and Gilles provide valuable insights into French Fascist ideals and aesthetics as well as the French Right's perception of the conflict in Spain. They also express to varying degrees the contradictory extremes of unbridled hope and the sense of imminent catastrophe which characterize much of historically conscious fiction written in France in the thirties.

Although neither Les Sept Couleurs nor Gilles focuses exclusively on the Spanish Civil War, the conflict is granted a privileged status in the novels, both in terms of narrative economy and the development of the hero. The segments in Spain occur at or near the end of the

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Spanish Civil War in Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 180

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.