Designing Women: Cinema, Art Deco, and the Female Form

By Lucy Fischer | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I am beholden to a variety of individuals and institutions for assistance on this project.

First, I would like to thank several people at my home institution, the University of Pittsburgh. I am indebted to the work of numerous research assistants: Louise Malakoff, Jessica Mesman, Jessica Nassau, Allana Sleeth, and Kirsten Strayer. I would also like to thank Andrea Campbell of the Film Studies Program for her help on this project, and Jim Burke and Joe Kapalewski of Photographic Services for their care in filming objects from my own collection. My Chair, David Bartholomae, allowed me to take a research leave of absence (on very short notice) and my Dean, John Cooper, made that leave a practical possibility. I received a Type II Research Grant from the university that enabled me to purchase numerous illustrations for the book, and I was a recipient of support from the Richard D. and Mary Jane Edwards Endowed Publication Fund.

I would like to credit the National Endowment for the Humanities, which supported my work by awarding me a Fellowship for University Professors in the spring of 2002. I am grateful as well to several individuals (and former colleagues) at the Museum of Modern Art who assisted with my research: Charles Silver in the Film Study Center, as well as Mary Corliss and Terry Geeskin in the Film Stills Archive. Several other individuals facilitated the procurement of images for this volume: John Findling of Indiana University Southeast, Tim Wilson at the San Francisco Public Library, Marcia Schiff at the Associated Press, Beverley Perman at Sevenarts, Ltd., Silvia Ros at the Wolfsonian, Katharine Oakes at the British Film Institute, and Jill Bloomer at the Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution. My gratitude further extends to several curators who invited me to

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