Designing Women: Cinema, Art Deco, and the Female Form

By Lucy Fischer | Go to book overview

AFTERWORD

This book, Designing Women, has sought to bring new perspectives to the study of Art Deco and the cinema —seen both as separate and interrelated subjects. When I began writing it, there was no concentrated scholarly text on the topic. Screen Deco by Howard Mandelbaum and Eric Myers provided lush illustrations of the style (as practiced in the movies) in conjunction with much useful commentary, but was primarily a gorgeous “coffee table” volume. While Donald Albrecht's Designing Dreams: Modern Architecture in the Movies illuminated the area of Deco set design, it failed to engage the movement's broader influence. Even such groundbreaking work on cinematic mise-en-scène as Charles and Mirella Jona Affron's Sets in Motion contained only passing reference to the Art Deco mode. When Designing Women was completed, a book emerged more consonant with my own approach: Anne Massey's Hollywood Beyond the Screen: Design and Material Culture. While a section of that study focuses on the American context, the work concentrates on the British incarnation of the Art Deco made through an examination of advertising, home design, and personal history. While Massey mentions in passing a few of the same films I consider (e.g., The Kiss and Metropolis), only one receives an in-depth analysis: Our Dancing Daughters. Finally, half of Massey's volume examines periods beyond the heyday of the Style Moderne: post-World War II culture and post-classical Hollywood. Thus, even now, a full cultural reading of Art Deco and the cinema is in its initial stages.

Designing Women has sought to bring a variety of new frameworks to the topic. First, it has tried to acknowledge the complexities of defining American Art Deco by underscoring its relation to the broader international Style Moderne, whose artistic lineage involves Expressionism, Art Nouveau, Cubism, Constructivism,

-253-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Designing Women: Cinema, Art Deco, and the Female Form
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 290

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.