Designing Women: Cinema, Art Deco, and the Female Form

By Lucy Fischer | Go to book overview

INDEX
Page numbers in bold indicate an illustration.
Abel, Alfred, 207
accessories: marketing, 64–65
Acosta, Mercedes de, 95
Adrian (Adrian Adolph Greenberg/costume designer): as Garbo's designer, 110–11, 112, 115–19; Madame Satan costumes, 205; The Mask of Fu Manchu costumes, 230; names of, 111n6; Wizard of Oz costumes, 250
adultery, 98, 104–107, 113
advertising: automobiles, 47; beauty products, 62–65; celebrity endorsement in, 63–64, 64, 72; clothing, 70–72; by department stores, 52–53; female body in, 73–75; female-oriented, 47; in Great Depression, 86–87; jewelry, 65; in middle-class publications, 70; modernism in, 47; Tropical/Exotic in, 155, 155. See also marketing; see also plates 5–9
Affron, Charles, 253
Affron, Mirella Jona, 253
African Americans: artists, 132; black females as “Primitive” symbols, 43; in fantasy films, 230–31; in movie musicals, 131–37, 145–46; Parisian attraction to black culture, 133; and shadow imagery, 132; in South Seas films, 182
Air Castles (illustration), 144
Albrecht, Donald, 14, 25–26, 253
Alcazar (Paris), 123
Alhambra (Paris), 123; Alhambra (San Francisco), 188
Allen, Frederick Lewis, 33
Allen, Woody, 124
alphabet series (Erté), 37–40, 37n9, 39. See also plate 3
Alston, Charles, 132
Americans: ambivalence toward modernism, 21–24; attitude toward Art Deco, 20–26; lack of representation at Paris Exposition, 21; zest for travel, 34
amusement parks, 200–201
androgyny: of Deco clothing, 69; of Garbo's clothing, 117–18; of New Woman, 32, 33
Anemic Cinema (1925), 135
Ann, Philson, 239
Archipenko, Alexander, 238
architecture: of Manhattan, 1–2; of movie theaters, 25, 186, 189–95, 189n1; Primitive in, 190–95; of Shangri-La, 246–47; tropes of, 15–16; Tropical/Exotic in, 155, 190–95
Argy-Rousseau, 30
Armat, Thomas, 200
Armitt, Lucie, 212, 222
Arnoux, Robert, 134
Art Deco: abstraction vs. physicality, 36; aesthetic of, 11–20, 27; American response to, 20–26; consumerism and, 19–20, 43–58, 254; in cultural studies, 253–54; European nature of, 20, 206; fantasy

-273-

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