Last Things: Emily Brontë's Poems

By Janet Gezari | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book has been a long time in the making, and I have many obligations that will go unmentioned. Like all those who write about the Brontës, I have an immediate debt to the scholars who have come before me. They include Margaret Smith, whose magesterial edition of Charlotte Brontë's letters has become indispensable, and Juliet Barker, whose biography has made so much new information about the lives of the Brontës available. I am grateful to Connecticut College for research grants supporting this project and to the American Brontëe Society and Theresa Connors, who invited me to address an enthusiastic and informed audience at the New York meeting in the spring of 2003, where I presented a shortened version of Chapter 7. Friends and colleagues who have read the typescript during its course of development and provided necessary advice and criticism include John Fyler, Charles Hartman, Willard Spiegelman, Christopher Ricks, and Vanessa Gezari. I am grateful to Oxford University Press for its dedication to the Brontës, to Andrew McNeillie for his support for this project, and to the press's two readers, Christine Alexander and Alison Chapman, who confirmed my sense of what I was doing and provided genuinely helpful criticism. A version of Chapter 3 appeared in ELH in 1999.

The publishers wish to thank the Bronteë Parsonage Museum Library and the British Library for permission to reproduce holograph manuscripts in their collections, and Faber and Faber Ltd. (UK and World) and Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, LLC (US) for permission to reprint 'Emily Brontë' from Collected Poems by Ted Hughes. Copyright 2003 by The Estate of Ted Hughes. Although every effort has been made to establish copyright and contact copyright holders prior to printing, the publishers would be pleased to rectify any omissions or errors brought to their notice at the earliest opportunity.

-vii-

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Last Things: Emily Brontë's Poems
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Figures x
  • A Note on Texts xi
  • 1: And First 1
  • 2: Last Things 8
  • 3: Fathoming 'Remembrance' 41
  • 4: Outcomes and Endings 59
  • 5: Fragments 79
  • 6: The First Last Thing 106
  • 7: Posthumous Brontë 126
  • Notes 151
  • Bibliography 169
  • Index 179
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