Baseball and the Media: How Fans Lose in Today's Coverage of the Game

By George Castle | Go to book overview

THREE
The Baseball Beat Writer

Tongues were wagging in press boxes all over the country in mid-summer 2004. Some of that verbiage suggested that Murray Chass was almost blasphemous in the acceptance speech he had just given for the Spink Award, given annually to a veteran baseball writer during the Hall of Fame induction ceremonies.

Chass had dedicated his long New York Times career, in which he was recognized as one of the game's preeminent baseball writers, to searching for the truth in the game. Now he believed he spoke of the same in his own business. “I covered baseball and pro football, but there came a time when I had to choose between them,” Chass told the multitudes in Cooperstown. “It was an easy choice. With games every day and news developing year-round, baseball was the more legitimate and challenging beat to cover.

“Unfortunately, too many baseball writers of recent vintage don't want to cover the beat. So many of them don't like the daily grind or don't like all the off-the-field developments that have intruded on the game on the field. I feel I [thrived] on the off-the-field part of the game. I thoroughly enjoyed [covering] nongame issues as well as nonbaseball stories, the World Series earthquake, for example, because they challenged me as a reporter and I thought of myself as a reporter who happened to cover baseball. I would encourage young baseball writers to adopt that attitude. They will be better for it.”

Then Chass suggested that not all that many of his junior colleagues might heed his advice. “But the first thing they have to do is cover the beat for more than the few years, if that long, that they cover it these days. In New York, for example, the turnover has been

-35-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Baseball and the Media: How Fans Lose in Today's Coverage of the Game
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 263

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.