Race in the American South: From Slavery to Civil Rights

By David Brown; Clive Webb | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

A book of synthesis such as this is only as good as the literature it has to work with. We must, therefore, acknowledge our debt to many varied historians for the rich and stimulating literature on race in the American South written in the last two decades. Many of the interpretations contained in this book have been shaped in debates with students. David Brown would like to acknowledge all students who have taken his southern and civil war modules, but particularly those at Sheffield University on the special subject 'Slavery and the Old South' in 2004–05 and 2005–06. He would also like to note the support of the late Peter J. Parish, who many years ago provided a crucial fee waiver allowing him to register at the Institute of United States Studies in London. Peter's synthetic skill as a historian and beautiful prose style were qualities we could only hope to match. Clive Webb is similarly grateful to William Dusinberre, who not only inspired his initial enthusiasm for southern history, but has also remained a guiding influence.

The support of friends and colleagues has also been essential. Simon Middleton typically did not guard his evaluations of early chapters on the colonial and revolutionary periods (anyone who knows Simon will know what that means!). Trevor Burnard also read the early chapters, providing a timely evaluation and much needed encouragement. Tim Lockley read the whole of the first half of the book, improving the prose and picking up errors of fact and interpretation. Michael Tadman also read the first half of the book and, once again, his searching comments and unwavering support was gratefully received and immensely valuable. Martin Crawford, David Gleeson and Emily West looked at specific chapters. Brian Ward provided an outstanding critique at a late stage in this project, which helped to improve both the style and the conceptualisation of the manuscript. We cannot thank these friends enough for their help. Robert Cook picks up the MVP award for reading the whole manuscript and parts of it more than once. His incisive evaluation and refusal to accept sloppy or inaccurate prose improved

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