Race in the American South: From Slavery to Civil Rights

By David Brown; Clive Webb | Go to book overview

Chapter 9

THE CHALLENGE OF REFORM: THE SOUTH IN
THE ERA OF THE WORLD WARS

On the eve of American intervention in the First World War, the South seemed to be a land suspended in time. In contrast to the urban and industrial North, the political and economic landscape of the southern states remained much as it had for decades. The old agrarian order still dominated the region. Southerners cultivated the land much as their ancestors had done, concentrating their labour on one staple crop, cotton. Whites also continued to assert their racial supremacy over African Americans, not only through the force of law but also through mob violence. The prospect of a New South, no longer reliant on cotton but instead integrated into the national industrial economy, had receded by the time the United States belatedly intervened in the war.

However, during the era of the world wars the American South underwent sudden changes that unsettled its social, political and economic foundations. Although the Jim Crow system absorbed much of the impact, the cumulative effect of these changes was to establish the preconditions for the civil rights revolution of the 1950s and 1960s. The exigencies of the Great Depression and the Second World War resulted in federal intervention in southern affairs on a scale not seen since Reconstruction. Such actions undermined the traditional pattern of rural labour relations, leading thousands of African American farmers to abandon the land, some heading north while others resettled in the rapidly expanding urban and industrial centres of the South. The influx of these rural migrants to southern towns and cities created problems for the continued maintenance of racial segregation. Federal intervention also raised hopes among African Americans of their future inclusion as full citizens of the United States, just as it raised fears among the white elite at the loss of their autonomous control of the region. By the time the military conflict of the Second World War came to an end, a new set of battle-lines had begun to emerge in the southern states between a black race animated by a sense of political entitlement and a white conservative opposition determined to resist reform.

-233-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Race in the American South: From Slavery to Civil Rights
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 392

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.