Race in the American South: From Slavery to Civil Rights

By David Brown; Clive Webb | Go to book overview

GUIDE TO FURTHER READING

GENERAL WORKS

The literature on the American South is enormous and potentially overwhelming for any student approaching it for the first time. However, there are a number of books that provide an accessible survey of southern history and culture. The most recommended of these titles are William J. Cooper, Jr, and Thomas E. Terrill, The American South: A History (New York: McGrawHill, 1996) and John B. Boles, The South Through Time: A History of an American Region (Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1995). J. William Harris, The Making of the American South: A Short History, 1500–1877 (Oxford: Blackwell, 2006) is an excellent survey of southern history up to Reconstruction, and is particularly good on southern politics. Peter Kolchin raises many important issues in defining and understanding what actually constitutes 'the South' in A Sphinx on the Land: The Nineteenth-Century South in Comparative Perspective (Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2003). A more thematic approach, with helpful analysis of the historiography of the region, is provided by John B. Boles (ed.), A Companion to the American South (Malden, MA: Blackwell, 2002). A valuable reference guide to the region is Charles Reagan Wilson and William Ferris (eds), Encyclopedia of Southern Culture (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1989).


AMERICAN SLAVERY

Even though slavery was not confined to the southern states until the nineteenth century, the history of American slavery is firmly entwined with the historical and cultural development of the South. Few subjects in American history have been so extensively and productively explored as slavery. Two excellent overviews of the origins, growth and maturation of North American plantation society are Ira Berlin, Generations of Captivity: A History

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