Claudia Jones: A Life in Exile

By Marika Sherwood; Donald Hinds et al. | Go to book overview

Symposium on Claudia Jones
28 September 1996

Session 3: The West Indian Gazette

Donald Hinds One of the terrible things in life is to have to confess that you are present somewhere and you really didn't know the full importance of it. It's like my pupils at school are busy doing their course-work on the Long March, and a woman who was on the Long March said, 'We didn't know we were on the Long March, we just knew that we were marching westward, westward, westward, all the time'. And I wish, listening to the debate this morning, that working with Claudia Jones had made me appreciative of how truly great her standing as an international person was. I have to confess that it didn't.

I came to the Gazette about the third issue, in 1958. I was working on the buses then, I think it was the No. 109 and I was on my way from the Embankment to Purley. I got as far as Burton Road and Brixton Road when Theo Campbell, whose name has been mentioned earlier, came on the bus; he was the man who opened, I think, the first Black record shop in London. He had a handful of West Indian Gazettes and I'd never heard of it, which is not really surprising as it was just about the third issue. He said, 'Would you like to buy one?' I said, 'Yes, more than that, I'd like to write for it'. So Theo said, 'OK, come down to the record shop and I'll introduce you to Miss Jones'. And as soon as my shift was finished, down I went to the record shop. Theo took me upstairs where the West Indian Gazette was and introduced me to Claudia, and I told her, 'a great idea', but above all I wanted to write. And after about twenty minutes or so she said, 'So, write. Go and get me an article'.

So I went out in the streets of Brixton with a copy of the Gazette in my hand, showing it to many people and asking them what they thought about it, was it a good idea to have a paper for Black people,

-196-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Claudia Jones: A Life in Exile
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 222

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.