Dwight David Eisenhower and American Power

By William B. Pickett | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE

The Politics of
Moderation

The way of life Eisenhower sought to protect through his domestic policy was, he believed, the most important source of American strength. Its principal element was the system of free enterprise. His administration, accordingly, would establish the cold-war government for the United States, for many of its features became permanent.

The individual who oversaw the execudve departments was Sherman Adams, chief of staff and assistant to the President. Eisenhower first noticed Adams, the wiry and hard-bitten former governor of New Hampshire, because of his activities on the general's behalf in the crucial New Hampshire primary of 1952. Adams had demonstrated his political savvy as floor manager during the Republican convention and was the perfect individual to see to it that the White House, like Eisenhower's wartime headquarters, was a no-nonsense operation. To many observers it appeared that the crusty New Englander, who made few friends because of his austere, abrupt, even caustic manner, actually was running the presidency. Eisenhower did nothing to disabuse people of this notion, any more than he did those who believed that Secretary of State Foster Dulles was single-handedly running foreign affairs. However, Adams's actual position was, in addition to his mana-

-139-

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Dwight David Eisenhower and American Power
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Editors' Foreword v
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction and Acknowledgments ix
  • Chapter One - Early Years 1
  • Chapter Two - War 22
  • Chapter Three - The Road to the White House 59
  • Chapter Four - Dilemmas of Power 98
  • Chapter Five - The Politics of Moderation 139
  • Chapter Six - Retirement 172
  • Conclusion 189
  • Bibliographical Essay 197
  • Index 217
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