The Idea and Ideal of the Town between Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages

By G. P. Brogiolo; Bryan Ward-Perkins | Go to book overview

VISUAL IMAGES OF THE TOWN IN LATE ANTIQUITY
AND THE EARLY MIDDLE AGES*

Carlo Bertelli

In the literature and visual arts of the period of transition from Antiquity to the Middle Ages, the political and religious authorities, the wealth, the daily commodities, and the ornaments of towns are all given a prominent place.

Constantinople was the source of many encomia and gave matter for reflection to contemporary historians, while being the promoter of great works of art, or more specifically of a new art. Notwithstanding a process of profound innovation, the links with the past were not severed; on the contrary, they were exhibited like guarantees of continuity. So reminders of past ages were welcome within the city walls not just for being famous works of art transferred from elsewhere, but also because they were authentic relics of old Rome.1 Other towns were, of course, less self-assertive, but as we shall see there was a marked difference between the image of a town which one could have in the ravaged West and that manifest in the moreor-less intact Orient.

Rome had a different history from any other town. The sack of the urbs by the Goths in 410 threw a Christian intellectual such as Saint Jerome into despair, but while her authority became more spiritualised and in that sense more pervasive, the physical survival of the town became a matter of concern for its rulers residing abroad. It was in 609 that the emperor Phocas gave the Pantheon to the

* The 11th International Congress of Christian Archaeology devoted a full ses-
sion to the theme of “L'image de la ville dans l'art et la littérature”, with contri
butions by J.G. Deckers, F. Bisconti, D. Korol, F. Rickert, U. Könen, P.-A. Février,
X. Barral i Altet. See Actes du XIe Congrès International d'Archéologie Chrétienne, II (Città
del Vaticano, 1989), pp. 1281–1403. All the contributions provided excellent mate-
rial for reflection and documentation. The present article however follows a different
approach.

1 G. Dagron, Naissance d'une capitale, Constantinople et ses institutions de 330 à 451,
2nd ed. (Paris, 1984); ed. H.G. Beck, Studien zur Frühgeschichte Konstantinoples, Miscellanea
Byzantina Monacensia 14 (Munich, 1973).

-127-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Idea and Ideal of the Town between Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 265

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.