Notes

INTRODUCTION

1. Hayden White, Tropics of Discourse: Essays in Cultural Criticism (Baltimore and London: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 1978).

2. This and all subsequent quotations from Shakespeare's text come from The Norton Shakespeare: Based on the Oxford Edition, edited by Stephen Greenblatt eta/. (New York: W. W. Norton, 1997).


CHAPTER 1

1. Lena Cowen Orlin, Ά Case for Anecdotalism in Women's History: The Witness Who Spoke when the Cock Crowed', English Literary Renaissance, 32 (Winter 2001), p. 75.

2. Steven Mullaney, 'Mourning and Misogyny: Hamlet, The Revenger's Tragedy, and the Final Progress of Elizabeth I, 1600-1607', Shakespeare Quarterly, 45 (1994), p. 141.

3. Ν. Η. Keeble, The Cultural Identity of Seventeenth-Century Woman: A Reader (London: Routledge, 1994), p. 186.

4. Anthony Fletcher, Gender, Sex and Subordination in England 1500—1800 (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 1995), pp. 120-2.

5. Karen Newman, Fashioning Femininity and English Renaissance Drama (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991), p. 40.

6. Frances E. Dolan, 'Reading, Writing, and Other Crimes', in Feminist Readings of Early Modern Culture: Emerging Subjects, edited by Valerie Traub, M. Lindsay Kaplan, and Dympna Callaghan (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996), p. 159.

7. Lynda E. Boose, 'Scolding Brides and Bridling Scolds: Taming the Woman's Unruly Member', Shakespeare Quarterly, 42 (1991), p. 195.

8. Peter Stallybrass, 'Patriarchal Territories: The Body Enclosed', in Rewriting the Renaissance: The Discourses of Sexual Difference in Early Modern Europe, edited by Margaret W. Ferguson, Maureen Quilligan, and Nancy J. Vickers (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1986), pp. 126-7.

9. Valerie Traub, 'Jewels, Statues, and Corpses: Containment of Female Erotic Power', in Shakespeare and Gender: A History, edited by Deborah E. Barker and Ivo Kamps (London and New York: Verso, 1995), p. 121.

-145-

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Shakespeare and Women
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Illustrations x
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: A Usable History 7
  • 2: The Place(S) of Women in Shakespeare's World 26
  • 3: Our Canon, Ourselves 48
  • 4: Boys Will Be Girls 72
  • 5: The Lady's Reeking Breath 95
  • 6: Shakespeare S Timeless Women 112
  • Further Reading 138
  • Notes 145
  • Index 161
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