Alabama in the Twentieth Century

By Wayne Flynt | Go to book overview

Copyright © 2004

The University of Alabama Press

Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487–0380

All rights reserved

Manufactured in the United States of America

Designer: Michele Myatt Quinn

Typeface: Granjon

The paper on which this book is printed meets the minimum
requirements of American National Standard for Information
Science–Permanence of Paper for Printed Library Materials,
ANSI Z39.48–1984.

Flynt, Wayne, 1940–

Alabama in the twentieth century / Wayne Flynt.

p. cm. — (The modern South)

Includes bibliographical references and index.

ISBN 0-8173-1430-X (cloth : alk. paper)

1. Alabama—History—20th century. 2. Alabama—Civilization—
20th century. I. Title. II. Series.

F326.F754 2004

976.1′063—dc22

2004002841

The author acknowledges permission to reprint quotations from the
following sources: From Booker T. Washington, “Useful Living”; and
from Grover Hall to Major Howell, November 29, 1936, Grover Hall
papers, courtesy the Alabama Department of Archives and History,
Montgomery Alabama. From E. B. Sledge, With the Old Breed at
Peleliu and Okinawa (Novato, Calif.: Presidio Press, 1981), courtesy of
John Sledge. From Gary Smith, “Crime and Punishment,” Sports Il-
lustrated, June 24, 1996, courtesy of Gary Smith. From Nanci Kin-
caid, Balls: A Novel (Chapel Hill, N.C.: Algonquin Books), courtesy
of Nanci Kincaid.

-iv-

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Alabama in the Twentieth Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction xv
  • Part One - Alabama's Political Economy 1
  • 1: In the Beginning the 1901 Constitution 3
  • 2: Every Man for Himself Politics, Alabama Style 29
  • 3: Selling Alabama the Economy 107
  • Part Two - Alabama's Society 173
  • 4: Life from the Bottom Up Society 175
  • 5: Teaching the People Education 220
  • 6: On and off the Pedestal Women 251
  • 7: Counting Behind White Folks African Americans 317
  • 8: Fighting Mad Alabamians at War 373
  • 9: Beyond the Game the Social Significance of Sports 407
  • Part Three - Alabama's Culture 441
  • 10: What Would Jesus Do? Religion 443
  • 11: Plain and Fancy Folk and Elite Culture 485
  • Notes 533
  • Selected Bibliography 545
  • Index 579
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