Science for Sale: The Perils, Rewards, and Delusions of Campus Capitalism

By Daniel S. Greenberg | Go to book overview

13
The Journals Revolt

Medical journals occupy a strategic junction in science. They publish the research findings that are ultimately embodied in the drugs and medical devices that physicians prescribe for their patients. For all parties involved in this movement, the journals are crucially important. Publication in peer-reviewed journals is indispensable for career advancement in academic research and its medical wing. The scientific culture allows no other way. Reports of clinical trials in peer-reviewed journals heavily influence the sale of medical goods, because practicing physicians rely on journals to keep them informed of new diagnostic methods and treatments. These circumstances entice manufacturers to employ wiles, inducements, and influence to receive favorable reports in the clinical literature, particularly in the most influential and widely read medical journals. Among the thousands of clinical publications published worldwide, the most prominent are JAMA, the New England Journal of Medicine, the Archives of Internal Medicine, the British Medical Journal, and the Lancet. With large readerships, these journals possess unparalleled prestige among researchers in the health sciences and practicing physicians seeking to keep abreast of the latest findings. Careful editing and screening of submissions give them credibility and luster,

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Science for Sale: The Perils, Rewards, and Delusions of Campus Capitalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • A Background Note and Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One: The Setting and the System 9
  • 1: Money for Science: Never Enough 11
  • 2: Elusive Industrial Angels 38
  • 3: Commercialize! It's the Law 51
  • 4: Changing Attitudes 82
  • 5: The Price of Profits 101
  • 6: Conflicts and Interests 127
  • 7: A New Regime 147
  • Part Two: As Seen from the Inside—six Conversations 179
  • 8: Success and Remorse 181
  • 9: A Congenial Partnership 195
  • 10: When the Rules Change in Midstream 205
  • 11: Profits and Principles 220
  • 12: Generations Apart 233
  • 13: The Journals Revolt 243
  • Part Three: Fixing the System 255
  • 14: What's Right and Wrong, and How to Make It Better 257
  • Epilogue: A Parable for Our Time 286
  • Abbreviations 295
  • Notes 297
  • Index 313
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