New York City Politics: Governing Gotham

By Bruce F. Berg | Go to book overview

8
The City Council

Term Limits

In 1993, Ronald Lauder, millionaire and cosmetics heir, initiated a campaign to place a charter amendment before the voters in November calling for term limits for all city elected officials. In 1989, Lauder had unsuccessfully run for mayor, losing to Rudolph Giuliani in the Republican primary even though he spent approximately fourteen million dollars, four times more than Giuliani (Roberts 1993a). In his campaign for term limits, Lauder was seeking to limit all elected city officials (mayor, comptroller, public advocate, borough presidents, and city council members) to two four-year terms. In a letter to the New York Times in September 1993, Lauder argued that term limits would address the advantages of incumbency and would “return citizen legislators to office, remove much of the incentive for incumbents to manipulate the rules to insure lifetime incumbency, provide a safeguard to eliminate the multiple abuses that can come with unlimited tenure in office, bring fresh views and opinions to political office, and provide a wider choice of candidates” (Lauder 1993).

The supporters of term limits focused on the advantages of incumbency. In recent city council elections, incumbents had won over 90 percent of the time and some members had been on the city council since the 1970s. Some believed that term limits would “reinvigorate the political grassroots” and involve more citizens in government (Roberts 1993b). Other interest groups, however, believed that the turnover of so many city council members would cripple the effectiveness of the city's legislative body (Roberts 1993b).

Opponents argued that if citizens wanted elected officials out of office, they could always vote them out by choosing another candidate. Term limits would deprive the voters of electing an effective legislator to a third term. Opponents were also concerned about who would serve on a term-limited city council. Although term limit supporters claimed that one of the benefits of term limits is that it would get rid of career politicians, opponents wondered who would be

-212-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
New York City Politics: Governing Gotham
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • 2: The Economic Development Imperative 20
  • 3: The State and the City 58
  • 4: The Federal Government and the City 88
  • 5: Racial and Ethnic Diversity 120
  • 6: Political Parties in New York City Governance 160
  • 7: The Charter, the Mayor, and the Other Guys 180
  • 8: The City Council 212
  • 9: The Municipal Bureaucracy 244
  • 10: Conclusion 281
  • References 293
  • Index 323
  • About the Author 339
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 340

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.