Facilitating Reflective Learning in Higher Education

By Anne Brockbank; Ian McGill | Go to book overview

7
Methods of Reflection for Tutors

Academic staff in HE may be asked to facilitate the development of reflection in their students with or without guidance. Unlike nursing and psychotherapy, the teaching profession has traditionally not required its members to engage in a reflective process. In the former professions a system of supervision insists that nurses, registered counsellors/ psychotherapists engage in reflection on their professional practice. This ensures that professional work is monitored on a continuing basis. In the case of psychotherapy/counselling this is a lifelong activity. Comparison with other professions suggests that a mandatory system of Continuing Professional Development, CPD, which includes reflective practice or supervision have the potential (not always realized) to include evidence of a reflective process. It is our contention that teachers in HE who do engage in such CPD are likely to be able to convey the nature of the process to their students. Developmental activity, which includes reflective practice, is an integral part of their work as professional academics. Kahn et al. (2006, p. 27) recommend

A directed process … which must both be targeted and supported as
this prevents the process from turning into 'metacognitive rambles on
minor aspects of teaching'.

(Grushka et at, 2005)

Before recommending reflective practice to their students, teachers may initially, wish to engage in reflective practice with colleagues in order to familiarize themselves with the approach. We are suggesting that teachers take examples of their practice to a reflective dialogue with colleagues or supervisors. Their practice could be about their method of teaching, research, scholarly activity, and course design. Within this approach to development we have the basis for colleague to colleague support and challenge.

For development to be more formalized, particularly with the advent and requirement for staff development reviews, teachers will have longer term aims they may wish to achieve. By facilitating reflective dialogue between

-142-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Facilitating Reflective Learning in Higher Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 369

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.