Qualities of Effective Teachers

By James H. Stronge | Go to book overview

5

Implementing Instruction

Kaz's physical education students change into gym clothes, exit the locker
room, and start jogging warm-up laps around the gym, which stop after the
last student out of the locker room completes one lap. A whistle blows once
and students immediately assume their line positions for a series of stretches
that are part of a well-established routine. Different students take turns lead-
ing the stretches while Kaz checks sick notes, tardy slips, and attendance. He
then tells the class that they will be focusing on basketball skill development
for the day. He points to different parts of the gym and explains that there is
a skill card at each station and that students will rotate through each station
twice. Each station focuses on a different skill: passing, dribbling, shooting,
shuttle run, rules, and critique. Each line goes to a different station and
begins. A couple of minutes later, Kaz blows the whistle twice and the stu-
dents stop. He tells the students to designate a student coach at each station;
that person is to record students' accuracy and progress with the various
skills. At the rules station, students use flash cards to quiz each other about
basketball rules. At the critique station, Kaz shows students videotaped seg-
ments from a college basketball game and models how to critique the player's
performance. Then he gives the students guided practice and tells them to
offer constructive criticism to each other during the skill drills. Periodically,
the whistle blows and students change stations. At the end of the class, Kaz
collects the cards and solicits student comments about strengths and areas in
which they still need further development.

Beyond teacher training, beyond rapport with students, and beyond skills in classroom management and organization, what do effective teachers actually do in the classroom? All of the previous chapters focus on the important personal qualities and social and organizational behaviors that surround the teaching process. Undoubtedly, a teacher's preparation,

-66-

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