The Moral Foundations of Educational Research: Knowledge, Inquiry, and Values

By Pat Sikes; Jon Nixon et al. | Go to book overview

2
Towards a social history of
educational research

Gary McCulloch

A theme that educational researchers have tended to neglect, certainly in Britain, is the history of educational research itself. This chapter seeks to encourage further research in this area. It does so from a standpoint that such history should not only be intrinsically interesting and rewarding in its own right, but also provide explanatory leverage on the problems and dilemmas of our own time. More than this, indeed, it can help to challenge the assumptions and values that are incorporated in contemporary educational discourse. As the late Brian Simon (1966) trenchantly observed, 'There is, perhaps, no more liberating influence than the knowledge that things have not always been as they are and need not remain so' (p. 92). One such set of values, frequently referred to by the contributors to this volume, is the supposed dichotomy between 'rigour' and 'relevance' in current parlance. A historical understanding of educational research helps us to reconstruct the debate around these terms and to approach them in different ways, as well as allowing us to trace the origins of the contemporary debate.


The case for social history

There are at least two important reasons why the history of educational research deserves greater attention than it has hitherto received. The first of these is that it can provide a means of understanding the contemporary crisis of educational research, and the solutions that have been developed for addressing this crisis. Over the past decade, educational research has come under intense public criticism from a range of well-placed and influential sources. In his Teacher Training Agency lecture of 1996, for example, David Hargreaves sparked fierce controversy over his claims that a radical change was required 'both in the kind of research that is done and the way in which it is organised' (Hargreaves 1996: 1). According to Hargreaves,

-18-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Moral Foundations of Educational Research: Knowledge, Inquiry, and Values
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 141

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.