The Moral Foundations of Educational Research: Knowledge, Inquiry, and Values

By Pat Sikes; Jon Nixon et al. | Go to book overview

3
Living research: thoughts on
educational research as moral
practice

Pat Sikes and Ivor Goodson


Introduction

Picture the scene: it's late in the evening and you're in the bar at a conference with colleagues and friends, some of whom you've not seen for a while, and someone starts reminiscing. 'Do you remember …?' Often the stories are about particular characters, their idiosyncrasies, proclivities and by now legendary exploits. Sometimes though, the emphasis is on times past (a la recherché de temps perdu), on recalling a zeitgeist, shared beliefs and values, commitments and motivations, good times, hard times, with evaluations coloured by what it's like now and our relative fortunes in different areas of our lives. We may come away from such sessions with regret for what's lost, or in gratitude that it's different now. If our imaginary conference is educational, in England, and if the company includes people aged around 45 plus, who have liberal or radical values, the chances are that some of the conversations will, no doubt, be about the 1960s and 1970s, covering curriculum development and innovation, Lawrence Stenhouse, the Schools' Council, democratic education, Countesthorpe College, and on how committed young women and men became teachers because they passionately and personally believed that the fast route to social reform, to social justice, was through education and schooling.

For educational researchers, those days were heady ones because there was a lot of optimism around and the 'profession' was growing and flourishing. During this time, a social identity as an educational researcher became more widely available and it's likely that many of those joining in our conversation will have taken it on then, often with the moral aim of acting as 'public intellectuals' (Goodson 1997), assisting in the task of social reconstruction and working for democratic education.

-32-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Moral Foundations of Educational Research: Knowledge, Inquiry, and Values
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 141

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.