Children, Youth and Adults with Asperger Syndrome: Integrating Multiple Perspectives

By Kevin P. Stoddart | Go to book overview

Introduction to Asperger Syndrome:
A developmental-lifespan perspective

Kevin P. Stoddart

He was reported to be a very difficult toddler, paying heed to neither his
indulgent mother nor his strict father. He was said to be unable to cope
with the ordinary demands of everyday life. The mother believed that it
was because of his clumsiness and impracticality that he had more diffi-
culties than other children. For instance, it was still necessary to dress
him, since, by himself, he would dawdle endlessly and also make a lot of
mistakes. He had learnt to eat by himself only recently and was still a
messy eater… Before he entered school everyone was convinced that he
would learn particularly well, since he was always making clever remarks
and original observations. Moreover, he had by himself learned to count
to twenty as well as picking up the names of various letters. At school
however, he failed miserably. (Asperger 1944/1991, p.59)

This was Hans Asperger's description of Ernst, a 7½-year-old boy seen in his clinic in Vienna. In his 1944 paper, Asperger reported on Ernst and other children who suffered from “autistic psychopathy”. His descriptions and analysis provide us with one of the first views of these children, their intriguing profile of skills, and puzzling deficits.

In terms of expressive characteristics, Asperger observed the abnormal eye gaze and “paucity of facial and gestural expression”. Just as he noted the limiting relational aspects of a fleeting gaze, Asperger felt the language of these children also impaired their ability to communicate nuance and relate to others. He characterized their language as feeling “unnatural” and being spoken “as if into empty space”. He termed the pragmatic deficits in communication, “contact-creating expressive functions”.

-13-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Children, Youth and Adults with Asperger Syndrome: Integrating Multiple Perspectives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 384

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.