Therapeutic Approaches in Work with Traumatized Children and Young People: Theory and Practice

By Patrick Tomlinson | Go to book overview

Introduction

'Trauma' can be understood to mean a profound emotional shock (Oxford Dictionary 1992). The theme of this book is thinking about children in a way that may help them to recover from their emotional traumas. Often, profound trauma in early childhood affects the whole of the child's development, causing serious delays and distortions. In some cases, the child's physical health and growth can suffer. For normal development to be recovered, the trauma needs to be understood. If a child is fortunate, this understanding can happen spontaneously at the time of the trauma. Such an understanding occurring may prevent long-term damage, for example, a grandparent who is emotionally attuned and empathetic where a child is traumatized within the immediate family. This support might just make the trauma comprehensible to the child so that the experience can be endured, thought about and integrated. Without some kind of supportive emotional involvement, the trauma remains as an unthinkable experience that continues to haunt the child (Fraiberg 1980). The child may experience this as a nameless dread (Copley and Forryan 1987, p.246) and be consumed by it, so that further emotional development is put on hold. Another possibility is that the child cuts off emotionally and seems emotionally frozen (Dockar-Drysdale 1958), feeling nothing real. The child who is highly anxious and the child who is emotionally frozen are both lacking the capacity to form attachments, receive nourishment, and engage in the ordinary experiences that enable growth and development. Referring to a child who was severely traumatized during the first year and who would chew cactus leaves, Bettleheim (1990) describes another possible reaction to trauma:

By inflicting on himself a parallel pain, he tried not only to obliterate
through pain the mental images which tortured him, but to convince
himself that he could be in control of a pain over which he had been able to

-15-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Therapeutic Approaches in Work with Traumatized Children and Young People: Theory and Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 223

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.