The New International Studies Classroom: Active Teaching, Active Learning

By Jeffrey S. Lantis; Lynn M. Kuzma et al. | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The origins of this project include a shared commitment to active teaching and learning and a good measure of intellectual curiosity. For years, we have been convinced that the many active teaching and learning techniques we use every day in the classroom are effective and exciting educational tools. Our commitment to active learning was further fueled by a natural inquisitiveness about how other teachers developed techniques for student engagement in the learning process. We began the process of sharing ideas about active learning in numerous forums over the last decade: from panel discussions at annual meetings of the International Studies Association (ISA) to the Pew Faculty Fellowship case method workshops at the John F. Kennedy School of Government; from sectional newsletters to e-mail conversations; and from faculty development programs to journal articles. In 1995, dedicated teacher-scholars helped to establish the Active Learning in International Affairs Section (ALIAS) of the ISA, and the seeds of this project truly began to take root.

We would like to express our appreciation to those who made this book possible. First, our contributors represent some of the most talented and proficient teacher-scholars in the country. They are developing and refining innovative, active teaching and learning techniques every day. Their contributions to this book have been outstanding and their dedication to quality education exemplary.

This book also represents a collaboration among three editors. We have truly enjoyed the opportunity to assemble and edit such a fine collection of works. Each of us brought different strengths to the

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