The New International Studies Classroom: Active Teaching, Active Learning

By Jeffrey S. Lantis; Lynn M. Kuzma et al. | Go to book overview

9 The United Nations
Security Council
Restructuring Summit
Jeffrey S. LantisThe “United Nations Security Council Restructuring Summit” is a role-playing simulation designed for an introductory international studies course in which students experience the dynamics of international cooperation and conflict. Student diplomats are faced with the challenge of creating a restructuring plan in order for the United Nations (UN) Security Council—an institution created in 1945 at the dawn of a new postwar era—to better represent the global political climate at the dawn of a new millennium. This is a tall order, but the “Security Council Summit” allows students to confront this challenge in a simplified form that requires only three to six class meetings for application. Students' comments from past runs confirm that the simulation is an interesting and effective way to learn more about international relations.The literature on the use of simulations in the classroom recommends that simulations include four major components:
Educational objectives.
Design parameters, such as background information and specific role assignments.
Functional procedures, including rules of procedure and protocol.
A debriefing period for discussion, assessment, and reflection.

Each of these elements was included in the design of the “Security Council Summit.”

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